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www.emiliaromagnaturismo.it Emilia-Romagna Turismo

Parmigiano Reggiano



Last update 13/08/2014 (ref.30109)
by the local editorial office of FANANO
Piazza Marconi, 1 41021 Fanano (MO)
Telefono: 0536/68803 int. 222 Fax: 0536/68954 Email: turismo@comune.fanano.mo.it

Parmigiano-Reggiano is a hard, granular cheese, cooked but not pressed, named after the producing areas near Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, and Bologna (all in Emilia-Romagna), and Mantova (in Lombardia), Italy. Under Italian law, only cheese produced in these provinces may be labelled "Parmigiano-Reggiano", and European law classifies the name, as well as the translation "Parmesan", as a protected designation of origin.

Parmigiano-Reggiano is commonly grated over pasta dishes, stirred into soups and risottos, and eaten on its own. It is often shaved or grated over other dishes.

Slivers and chunks of the hardest parts of the crust are sometimes simmered in soup. They can also be just roasted and eaten as a snack.

The hollowed-out crust of a whole wheel of Parmigiano can be used as a serving pot for large groups.

The name is trademarked and, in Italy, legal exclusive control is exercised over its production and sale by the Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Consorzio, which was created by a governmental decree. Each wheel must meet strict criteria early in the aging process, when the cheese is still soft and creamy, to merit the official seal and be placed in storage for aging.

According to legend, Parmigiano-Reggiano was created in the course of the Middle Ages in Bibbiano, in the province of Reggio Emilia. Its production soon spread to the Parma and Modena areas. Historical documents show that in the 13th and 14th centuries, Parmigiano was already very similar to that produced today, which suggests its origins can be traced to far earlier.

It was praised as early as 1348 in the writings of Boccaccio; in the Decameron, he invents ‘a mountain, all of grated Parmesan cheese’, on which ‘dwell folk that do nought else but make macaroni and ravioli, and boil them in capon's broth, and then throw them down to be scrambled for; and hard by flows a rivulet of Vernaccia, the best that ever was drunk, and never a drop of water therein.’[3]

During the Great Fire of London of 1666, Samuel Pepys buried his "Parmazan cheese, as well as his wine and some other things" to preserve them.

This cheese along with other dairy products are produced in our region by:

-La Latteria del Cimone - Via Ca' Frati 200 - 0536/ 68 031 - 0536/ 901 197;
-Il Caseificio Fior di Latte - Via Poggiolo 580 - 0534/ 31 126